LIMES in Nijmegen

The first Roman legions arrived in 19 BC. in the modern town of Nijmegen, and settled in a fortress at the Hunerberg in the eastern of the city. Shortly thereafter, the historical known Batavian capital Oppidum Batavorum (Batavodurum) was founded in the vicinity.

The Batavians revolted against the Romans in AD 69/70, and Oppidum Batavorum was destroyed by fire. A new fortress for Legio II adiutrix was erected on the ruins of the Batavian capital, but the legion was moved in AD 71 to Chester in Britannia the following year.

They were replaced by Legio X gemina that built a new fortress at the Hunerberg. At the same time, a new capital for the Batavians was built more to the west, which was named Ulpia Noviomagus by Emperor Marcus Ulpius Traianus around the year AD 100 (the name Nijmegen is derived directly from Noviomagus). At the same time, the capital was granted town privileges by the emperor, making Nijmegen the oldest town of the Netherlands.

Around 160-170 AD the city was destroyed by fire. Under Emperor Septimius Severus the town was rebuilt and even expanded. At the end of the 3rd century, the town was abandoned and the military and civilian population was concentrated in a newly built castellum at the Valkhof in the center of Nijmegen.

The conference venue is partly lying within the ditch of this reinforcement. This castellum was in the Carolingian period transformed into a Pfalz where Charlemagne regularly stayed during his visits to the Lower Rhine Area.

Executive Committee

  • Dr. Rebecca Jones, Historic Environment Scotland
  • Dr. Andreas Thiel, Landesamt für Denkmalpflege Baden-Württemberg

Scientific Program Committee

  • Dr. Mark Driessen, Leiden University
  • Erik Graafstal MA, Municipality of Utrecht
  • Tom Hazenberg MA, National Roman Maritime Museum & Leiden University
  • Dr. Tatiana Ivleva
  • Dr. Carol van Driel-Murray, Leiden University
  • Dr. Harry van Enckevort, Municipality of Nijmegen

Committee of Recommendation

  • Hubert Bruls, Mayor, Municipality of Nijmegen
  • T.b.n. Province of Gelderland
  • T.b.n. Province of Utrecht
  • T.b.n. Province of Zuid-Holland

Organizing Program Committee

  • Ilona Haas, Municipality of Nijmegen
  • Peggy Kersten, In-Act Marketing & Organization
  • Anne Otten, In-Act Marketing & Organization
  • Dr. Harry van Enckevort, Municipality of Nijmegen

Code of Conduct

The International Congress of Roman Frontier Studies (LIMES Congress) is committed to provide a harassment-free and discrimination-free congress experience for everyone, regardless of gender, gender identity and expression, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, ethnicity, religion or belief. Harassment of any kind to speakers, congress staff, volunteers and attendees will not be tolerated within the LIMES Congress.

Harassment includes offensive verbal comments related to gender, gender identity and expression, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, ethnicity, religion, technology choices, sexual images in public spaces, deliberate intimidation, stalking, following, harassing photography or recording, sustained disruption of talks or other events, inappropriate physical contact, and unwelcome sexual attention. No attendee should under any circumstance engage in harassment of other attendees either in person or online.

Participants asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately. If a participant engages in harassing behavior, the congress organisers may take any action they deem appropriate, including warning the offender or expulsion from the current and/or future congress with no refund.

If you are being harassed, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, please contact a member of congress staff immediately. Congress staff can be identified as they will be wearing branded clothing and/or badges.

Congress staff will be happy to help participants contact hotel/venue security or local law enforcement, provide escorts, or otherwise assist those experiencing harassment to feel safe for the duration of the congress.

We value your attendance. We expect participants to follow these rules at conference and workshop venues and conference-related social events.

Congress Venue

Location

De Lindenberg
Ridderstraat 23
6511 TM Nijmegen
The Netherlands

Who should attend?

The LIMES Congress (Congress on Roman Frontier Studies) is a worldwide academic forum for researchers currently working on all aspects of Roman frontiers in Europe, Asia and Africa.

City of Nijmegen

The first Roman legions arrived in 19 BC. in the modern town of Nijmegen, and settled in a fortress at the Hunerberg in the eastern of the city. Shortly thereafter, the historical known Batavian capital Oppidum Batavorum (Batavodurum) was founded in the vicinity.

The Batavians revolted against the Romans in AD 69/70, and Oppidum Batavorum was destroyed by fire. A new fortress for Legio II adiutrix was erected on the ruins of the Batavian capital, but the legion was moved in AD 71 to Chester in Britannia the following year.

They were replaced by Legio X gemina that built a new fortress at the Hunerberg. At the same time, a new capital for the Batavians was built more to the west, which was named Ulpia Noviomagus by Emperor Marcus Ulpius Traianus around the year AD 100 (the name Nijmegen is derived directly from Noviomagus). At the same time, the capital was granted town privileges by the emperor, making Nijmegen the oldest town of the Netherlands.

Around 160-170 AD the city was destroyed by fire. Under Emperor Septimius Severus the town was rebuilt and even expanded. At the end of the 3rd century, the town was abandoned and the military and civilian population was concentrated in a newly built castellum at the Valkhof in the center of Nijmegen.

The conference venue is partly lying within the ditch of this reinforcement. This castellum was in the Carolingian period transformed into a Pfalz where Charlemagne regularly stayed during his visits to the Lower Rhine Area.